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Why Aren't Your Sales People Selling?

Tony Cole

Tony Cole

Tony Cole, Founder and CEO of Anthony Cole Training Group

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Sorrow and Joy – Life and Selling

  
  
  
  
  

This morning, I was sitting at our kitchen table reading some headlines to my son, Anthony, as he waited for the transportation van to take him to the Goodwill CARE program that he participates in every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.  I said goodbye to him as he left for the day… and then continued to browse through Sunday’s Cincinnati Enquirer.

Louisville Slugger

I forget who the comedian was, but I remember the line, “I read the obituaries every day.  If my name isn’t in there, it’s a good day.”  Sounds like something the late Rodney Dangerfield would have said.  I’m flipping through the paper, come to the obituaries and I instantly recognize a face, a young face.  Joe Rippe, Jr. passed away on July 30th after his long battle with brain cancer.  It startled me, saddened me and frightened me.

You don’t expect to see a picture of someone you know in the obits.  Joe and I knew each other a long time ago, and though I hadn’t seen Joe in years, I considered him a friend.  It’s startling to read that he is no longer alive.  I am saddened for his family.  Loss is never easy no matter how you try and paint the picture of “now he’s in a better place.”  Yes, Joe is in heaven.  That has to be better than battling cancer. That doesn’t mean he won’t be missed and that there won’t be sorrow this year and every year around special dates and holidays.

It definitely frightened me.  I’ll be 60 in December.  (Now, THAT is out of the bag, let’s move on – save all your smart comments for later... ha-ha)  My very good friend, David O’Dell died of brain cancer when he was only 40.  Another great friend and business client, Jay Irwin, died of a heart attack between the 9th and 10th hole of a golf course when he was only 55.  I admit this isn’t a LONG list, but it’s a list.  I’ve had polyps removed, had radioactive seed implants for prostate cancer and, two years ago, had an eye biopsy to check for ocular cancer.  It’s frightening to think about all the things that can take us from this world.

In the same paper, in the sports section of USA Today, there was an article about Paul O’Neil - formally of the Reds and the NY Yankees.  In a ceremony on Saturday, they placed a plaque with his likeness in Monument Park behind center field of Yankee Stadium. He will be there with other greats like Ruth, Demaggio, Gherig, and someday, Mariano Rivera.  This honor must have given him and his family great joy.

I met Paul 14 years ago when we were sharing a small gym coaching elementary school basketball.  I was coaching my daughter’s team and I assume he was coaching his son’s.   My son, Anthony, was about 15 months post-cardiac arrest and anoxic brain injury.  Before his health ‘accident’, he loved sports.  He thought Paul O’Neil was great!  I approach Paul one evening at practice, I told him about my son’s condition and inquired if there was anything he could sign that I could give to him.  He said he had the perfect thing and he would bring it next week to practice.

I missed the follow week’s practice due to illness.  I returned the following week.  As we were beginning practice, Paul walked into gym, saw me and came right over.  He said, “I brought something for your son last week but you weren’t here. I have it at home I’ll be right back.”  I didn’t even have time to tell him it could wait till next week, when he was out the door. 

15 to 20 minutes later, he came in with a signed baseball bat.  I brought it home to Anthony, told him the story, and he smiled.  He hadn’t regained his ability to talk yet, so he just smiled.  Not just any old smile, but a great big smile of real joy.  He was grateful that I had thought of him and that Paul O’Neil thought enough about him to provide him with this bat.

Reading this article I felt joy for Paul.   Not for what he did on the field or in the clubhouse, although I’m happy for his accomplishments, success and this recognition.  But, reading the article brought back a memory of joy for what he did for a family he didn’t even know.  I still see Paul drive through the neighborhood.  When I do, I wave and he waves back politely though I’m sure he has no idea who I am. And that is okay.

This is a sales management blog… so you must be wondering, “What is the connection between Joe Rippe’s passing, a baseball bat from Paul O’Neil and selling?”

Selling and managing sales people is similar to these events in that they can startle, frighten, sadden and bring joy all in a matter of minutes.  The key here is that the world doesn’t stop and wait for you to recover from any of these events.  The world just turned a couple of more clicks as you read this today.  The world will keep on turning as you deal with something that startles you, saddens you, frightens you or brings you joy.

Take them all in stride, keep an even pace.  Don’t get too frightened, too sad or too joyous.  Life is life, selling is selling.  When it is all said and done, you will not be remembered for the sales you made or the ones that got away.  You won’t be remembered for the failed sales people or the successful ones.  You will be remembered for the impact you had on people’s lives.  You’ll be remembered for the time you took, the caring you had, and the effort you put into doing your best.

You get the chance every day to influence.  How you do that will eventually show up in the papers.

 

Did you like today’s post? If so, you’ll love our weekly audio Sales Brew and monthly newsletter! Sign up HERE and receive Tony Cole’s eBook, Why is Selling So #%&@ Hard?, as our thanks to you!

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Check Your Selling Gauges

  
  
  
  
  

Back a few years ago, when I was teaching my daughter how to drive, I tried to teach her good driving habits. One critical habit that I tried to help her recognize was to read the gauges, or what they call in aviation, complete a radial scan.

I explained to her that, prior to taking off in a car, you’ve got to make sure that there isn’t a light on telling you that your air pressure is low or that there’s an engine problem. There are several critical things that are often overlooked, but probably the most common mistake people make is failing to check the gas gauge.  They go out on the road and then when they’re 10 miles from the closest gas station, the computer tells them that they’re low on fuel. Not a good position to be in.

gauge

How does this relate to selling? Well, let’s assume for a second that you know how to uncover what we describe as severe mental anguish – you know, motivation to take action, or what some people call pain. Let’s also assume for a moment that you are really good at this part. But, for some reason, when you end your presentation, you’re still getting think-it-overs.

Often the think-it-over is a result of budget – budget for time, budget for money, and budget for resources needed to fix the problem that you uncovered in the initial interview. So, what happened?

What happened is that you have not developed the habit of checking your gauges and completing the radial scan. You’ve not developed the habit of making sure that they have enough “fuel”; you haven’t determined if the resources needed to fix the problem actually exist. You either assume that they’re there – always a problem to assume – or you’ve been taught that checking for budget isn’t that important because they are already spending money on your product and your job is just to get them to spend it with you.

This is a huge problem. Huge, because if you are doing your job well at uncovering problems, your solution may actually require additional resources – not just the same or less.  This is also a huge problem because, if you are in the habit of selling based on saving the client money, then every year you’re going to have to work twice as hard to find savings in order to keep that business.

So, the solution?

Develop the habit of scanning the gauges. The resource gauges in selling are time, money and resources. Resources could be people, technology or facilities. If you don’t check these gauges, I can almost guarantee you that, when you close for the sale, you’ll get a message that sounds like your car computer: NEED TO LOOK AT THE NUMBERS.  CHECK FUEL. FUEL IS LOW. In other words, your client may not have the resources to solve their problem. You’ve got to “check the gauges” and make sure that they do.

Have a perfect day.

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3 Critical Rules of Prospecting

  
  
  
  
  

Today, let’s talk about effective prospecting. At Anthony Cole Training, we have a program called The Rules and Gottas of Prospecting.  I must honestly tell you that there is a fine line between a rule and a gotta and it gets a little fuzzy sometimes. But, that’s a whole other discussion.

Hating the phone

Today, I want to talk with you about 3 of the 5 rules that we cover in that session.  

1) You don’t have to LIKE prospecting; you just have to do it. – I learned this rule from David Sandler. It comes into play every day when you go to your office and there on the desk is the 800lb gorilla – your telephone. And very rarely in my career as a trainer have I found people that just LOVE to prospect. But, like I said, you don’t have to love it, you don’t have to hate it, you just have to do it.

2) If you learn to like prospecting, you WILL do more of it. – Now, I know that I just stated in Rule #1 that you don’t have to love it or hate it, but what I have also experienced is that, if you learn to like something, you will have a tendency to repeat that something over and over again. Anything else that you do come to mind that fits into that category? Well, the same thing happens with prospecting. And the best way to learn to like something is to have fun. This isn’t life or death, so go out and have a blast with it.

3) Don’t look, act or sound like a sales person. Here’s a test. If you were calling you, would you recognize your call as a call from a sales person? If the answer to that is “yes”, then guess what? You sound like one and you probably would hang up on yourself. So, don’t look or act like a sales person.

If you would like to find out about the other 2 rules, then call our office at 513-791-3458 and we will be glad to help you. Thanks for joining us… now, have a perfect day. 

Additional Resources

Pre-Call Planning Process

Post-Call Debrief Process

Did you like today’s post? If so, you’ll love our weekly audio Sales Brew and monthly newsletter! Sign up HERE and receive Tony Cole’s eBook, Why is Selling So #%&@ Hard?, as our thanks to you!

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How to Avoid a Sales “Choke”

  
  
  
  
  

Guest Post By Walt Gerano, Sales Development Expert

When working with prospects and clients, I’m generally a couple of moves ahead; I think well on my feet and I know what to say next. But, I must admit, that sometimes, I get excited or upset during a sales call because I get caught off guard by with a question or response from a prospect.

When was the last time you asked yourself, “Why did I do that? Why did THAT happen?”

Upset Sales Person

Do you know how to respond to critical sales moments… or do you choke? The moments I described earlier are what we call “choke situations”. You know, situations where we tend to get emotionally tangled and taken off-course by our prospect.

Have you ever felt or thought any of the following:
          - Frustrated?
          - Worried?
          - Intimidated?
          - Lost for words?
          - Stumbling over words?
          - Found yourself talking too much?
          - Wished they hadn’t said something or asked you something?
          - Wondered what you should be saying next or didn’t exactly know
            what you should do next?
          - Felt like the think you just said could have been the wrong thing?
          - Gotten back in the car and say, “Why in the world did I say that?” or
           “Why didn’t I say that?”

Well, the answer is, of course, that we all have.  The next question is, “What’s the impact on your business?” I’ll let YOU answer that one.

Ok, so if that’s part of the problem, what’s the cure? Well, I’m going to give you 5 steps to follow to avoid “choke situations”:

  1. Be sure to maintain what we call “clinical detachment”.  In other words, don’t get emotionally involved. By the way, that DOESN’T mean you need to lack enthusiasm.
  2. Sometimes in the course of an interaction with a client or prospect, they’re going to throw you a curve ball. You can hit a curveball IF you know it’s coming… so be ready. 
  3. Listen intently to what they say. Listening does NOT mean that you aren’t talking.
  4. Don’t think ahead - stay in the moment. Pay attention to what’s going on. Observe their body language, what they say and how they say it. 
  5. Have good pacing.  Slow down. Don’t be afraid to allow silent pauses in the conversation.

Now, your mission, should you decide to accept it, is to identify 3 situations where you find yourself getting emotionally involved, i.e. choking.  And decide how you will respond differently the next time it happens. Be patient; it’s a process. Remember, your main job is to qualify the prospect and you need to have a pipeline of enough qualified prospects so you can execute your strategy from a position of strength, not out of fear.

Thanks for stopping by. Now, have a great day.

***************

Read more by Walt Gerano on his blog, Selling For Life

Did you like today’s post? If so, you’ll love our weekly audio Sales Brew and monthly newsletter! Sign up HERE and receive Tony Cole’s eBook, Why is Selling So #%&@ Hard?, as our thanks to you!

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Go Huskies! Go Sell!

  
  
  
  
  

I’m normally one to watch a movie, read a book or listen to a song and tie it to sales and/or sales management.  And, even though I use a lot of sports analogies, I rarely use sport stories or examples in my blog post or Sales Brew Newsletters.  But given the recent victory by my alma mater, THE University of Connecticut, I want to share some observations about their road to the Final Four and eventual Championship.

Basketball hoop

This is what I observed about the Huskies and, to be fair to all those in the Final Four, the other teams that they played against or who played in the tournament.

The question, the point to be made is this: Why did they win?

1.      Grit - In Dan Pink’s book, Drive, he discusses what gives winners the edge, and often it’s just GRIT: “A non-cognitive, non-physical trait.”  Time and again, I saw the Huskies and others in the tournament just go to a different ‘’place” mentally and/or emotionally.  They turned it up a notch and just refused to lose.

2.      Excellence in the simple things – In the championship game against UK, the Huskies did not get to the free throw line many times, but when they did, they were excellent.  As a matter of record, they were PERFECT - 10 for 10 from the line.  Kentucky on the other hand was not as excellent – 13 for 24. For the tournament, UConn shot 87.7% from the line – a tournament record.  (UConn won by 6 points – imagine what the outcome could have been if UK had just been good at the line! 79%)

3.      Execute the system – In the middle of the second half of the game, UK makes a run and gets to within 1, takes the lead, loses the lead, gets back to 1.  During this run, the Huskies stopped executing their system – their offense.  You could see it.  Even if you don’t know basketball and you had watched them the first half compared to how they where playing during the run, you would see that they stopped executing the system.  What got them BACK into the game, kept them in the game, and then kept them in the lead for good, was they got back to their system.  There is a point where Napier, the point guard, pushes his teammate, Boatright, to get back in position to run the “play”.

4.      Take chances – They call them “turnovers” when a team loses the ball to the opponent.  Many of the turnovers that UK had were a result of UConn attempting to disrupt – steal the ball from - UK’s offense.  They converted almost every steal to points.  You have to take some risk, and when you do, you have to do everything possible to convert the risk effort.

5.      Coaching and Preparation: Mentally – Ken Ollie had his team ready for the competition.  You could tell that they were prepared to take it to the other team, they were prepared for the other team to make runs, they were prepared to take advantage of the “free” opportunities.

6.      Defend the territory – If you watch an animal defend its territory, then you get the feel for what the UConn defense was like.  They smothered the ball, they rebounded, and they “forced” turnovers.

Summary:

  •  Grit
  • Excellence in the simple things
  • Execute the System
  • Take Chances
  • Get coaching be prepared
  • Defend the territory

 Question:  How does this pertain to you and what you do? Take a moment and leave a comment.

 Go Huskies! Go Sell!

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5 Keys to Building a Successful Sales Team – Laying The Ground Work

  
  
  
  
  

As I think about this concept, I realize that I may actually discuss more than just 5 keys.  These elements, or contributing factors, can be called “keys” but they can just as easily be called the 5 elements of successful sales teams or the 5 contributing factors of successful sales teams.  5 Keys sounds too finite or definitive but, although I’ve never claimed to have the definitive answers to building successful sales teams, I am convinced that if you have strong Performance Management, Recruiting, Coaching, Motivating and Mentoring, then you have a very good chance of success. 

However, as I sit here in Delta’s seat 2D(pleasant surprise – I got bumped to first class) returning from the BISA Annual Conference, I realize that I need to build a little ground work before I get into the FAB 5 of building successful sales teams. 

groundwork

Ground Work – Here are some things that I’ve come to believe about building and leading a successful sales team:

·         The manager’s primary responsibility is to put the best team in the market place.

·         The manager must be able to discern between what is controllable, what is not controllable, what they should attempt to control and what they need to let go.

·         Jim Collins in Good to Great nails it when he states that “if you have to manage your people, then you’ve hired the wrong people.”

·         The central theme of Rham Charam and Larry Bossidy’s book, Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done - There must be a clear process that is consistently executed in order to get things done

·         The Harvard Business Review definition of the manager’s job as aligning resources for the teams to execute the business strategies.

·         To begin implementation of our Sales Managed Environment, our clients must understand and commit to the following:

o   They must lead for results, manage behavior and coach activity.

o   Management is not about being nice or being mean.  It’s about holding people accountable to THEIR commitments and having a meaningful process to reward success and a disciplined (not punitive) approach to correct failure.

·         The manager must be willing to face the reality that their systems, processes and teams are perfectly designed for the results they are currently getting.

·         The key to changing results is to change behavior, improve skills and execute the process.  The key to changing behavior, and improving skill and execution is attitude.  The key to changing attitude is to changing beliefs.

More to follow…

 

Resources:

www.anthonycoletraining.com/resources

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Want Sales Success? Practice. (We’re Talking About Practice?!?)

  
  
  
  
  

Several years ago, a video with Allan Iverson (then with the Philadelphia 76ers) went viral.  Apparently, there was a problem between him and his coach Larry Brown about a practice session that Iverson missed.  When questioned about it by the press, Iverson goes on and on and on (see video) about practice.

Iverson

Switching sports – let’s talk baseball.  Teams are now reporting for spring training in various locations in Florida and Arizona.  Supporting the local economy and their teams that arrive for spring training, fans flock to watch practices and games.  For many, this is just as much a spring ritual for the fans as it is for the athletes on the field.

Derek Jeter of the NY Yankees will be 40 in June of this year.  He was drafted in 1992 by the Yankees.  He’s been at this a while.  Let’s conservatively pretend that he didn’t start to hit Major League Batting Averages until 2002.  Assuming that is the case, he has approximately 615 at bats per season and has faced 6.5 pitches per at bat.  I’m going to round the number to 4,000 pitches per season.

Defensively, let’s say he has averaged 140 games per year since 2002; that would mean he has played 1,734 games and spent 15,612 innings in the infield facing at a minimum of 3 batters per inning.  I won’t bore you with more numbers, but let’s say that he’s made a few fielding plays in those 15,612 innings.  Let’s also say he’s pretty good:  Rookie of The Year, Gold Glove (5), Silver Slugger (5), World Series MVP (1), Hand Aaron Award (2), Roberto Clemente Award, All Star Appearances(19), and has been the All Star MVP.

Derek is contracted through 2014 - even though he only played in 7 games last year.  So, as the team prepares for the season down there in Tampa, Florida, what do you suppose Derek is doing?

Practicing.  He will practice infield, base running, batting, bunting, advancing runners, fly balls, throwing and catching.

Why?  Because that is what it takes to be the best.

Why then, as professional sales people, should we see ourselves any differently?  Why do we shy away from training programs?  Why do we hesitate instead of embrace role-playing?  Why do we feel that we practice and improve our skills simply by executing our sales activities day in and day out?

I wish I had the answer to those questions, but I do not.  What I do know is if I would intend to sell more, sell more quickly, be more effective, then I must:

Practice, Practice, Practice

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The High Stakes Game of Selling

  
  
  
  
  

I once spoke with a regional president of a bank that did not believe that selling is like a game.  I am not one to argue.  However, as I consider his comment, I still believe two things:  1) Selling really IS very much like a game and 2)  People ought to be able to defend their answers.  I don’t care how they do it as long as they defending their position with more than just saying, “I don’t believe…”

I’ve read Money Ball by Michael Lewis and now I’m reading Trading Bases by Joe Peta.  I made it through Money Ball because it was entertaining and I could see the relationship between selecting players to play the game of baseball and selecting sales people to sell.  So far, I’ve not had that success with Trading Bases – there’s just too much data.

                        moneyball book cover

For those of you who know me, you’re probably thinking, “What?!? Tony has too much data?!? No way!”  Well, it’s true I love useful data.  I love to look at data to find out what has to happen with a sales team to help it become more successful.  I love to help sales people gain insight from data to help them sell more business, more quickly at higher margins.

BUT the data in this book has me dazed and confused.

Whenever I read a book about using data to improve, I think about two things: 1)  Using predictive data to help sales executives betting on the success of their next hire.  2) Helping sales professionals improve the odds of closing more closable prospects.  As for #1:  I only know of one really good source for “betting on sales talent”; that is the Objective Management Group Sales Evaluation and the Sales Evaluation and Impact Analysis.

It’s very, very good.  I would bet on that data every day of the week.

As for #2 – How DO sales people improve their odds of closing more business?   Well, this is what you should do to improve your odds:  1) Make sure you are working with prospects that your company has products and services for.  2) Make sure you are calling at the “yes” decision making level in the organization, family or business.  3) Make sure you have taken the time to uncover the problem that has to be solved AND your prospect has told you that this is a “have to fix” problem.  4)  Make sure that the money available to solve the problem is enough to pay for your product or service.  5)  Make sure you have studied the ripple effect of change – i.e. who will push back on a decision to change, purchase or move forward.  6)  Make sure you deal with the ripple effect.  7)  Make sure you know the decision making process and you have done everything you can do to get a decision when you present your solution.  8)  Eliminate the incumbent.  Make sure your prospect is committed to making a change.  9) Eliminate the “think it over” option at time of close.   

Do these things and you will have more sales success.  Record how well you do these things and your “winning” becomes more predictable, which means you can bet on your wins.

Free Assessment Tools

Call 513.791.3458 and ask to talk to me about Sales Success and On-Track Management.

Anthony Cole Training Website

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Drivers of Sales Success: Desire

  
  
  
  
  

Desire is critical for great success in sales and in all walks of life and endeavors. I’m not sure that’s a fact, but it’s certainly my strong opinion. I don’t know how anyone can deal with the challenges and obstacles to great success without a burning passion to succeed. But, then again, that’s just my opinion.

I walked off of a football field for the very first time in my hometown of Hammonton, NJ. I was 9 years old and was trying out for the Hammonton Hawks Pop Warner football team. I walked up to my dad and he asked, “Well, whaddya think?”  I said, “I’m going to go to college someday and play football!”  Dad replied, “Well then, you better go run some laps around the field. You have to be in great shape to play football in college.” Off I ran, 8 laps, 2 miles.

Football goal

13 years later, I finished my football playing career on the football field of Holy Cross University in Wooster, Massachusetts. We lost 41 to 40. I cried like a baby. It hit me all of sudden that I would never again play the game I loved so much and devoted so much time to.

I don’t have the same passion and desire to succeed in selling. I have passion for success in selling because of my passion for success in other areas. And because selling is what I do, I have to be successful at my profession. Don’t get me wrong; I love what I do. I love talking to executives about their companies, their challenges and their objectives. I love looking for solutions, love working with their people, and love helping others succeed. I am a coach by nature and that is what I love doing.

The passion that drives me in sales - my desire for success in sales - stems from other areas.  I’m afraid of poverty. I hate failing. I hate the idea that I won’t provide well enough for my family to have the life that they deserve to have and that I want them to have. I have a son that has significant challenges that can cost a lot of money. I have a daughter that will someday want a fine wedding and my wife and I love to back country fish and hang out in the Keys. I want to spend more of my remaining days doing the things I love doing: Spending time with my wife Linda, hanging out with my son, taking a bike ride with my good friend Jerry, going to see Mike in DC and dancing with my daughter at her wedding.

This is my passion that drives me to succeed in sales. What’s yours?

Additional Resource:  Ignite the Fire Within Workshop (Keynote)

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Hiring Better Sales People (pt.1)

  
  
  
  
  

How do you go about finding sales talent?  What challenges have you had trying to hire better sales people?  When you replace someone, because they leave or you let them go, is the replacement better, the same or worse than the recently departed?

Manager with Bag on Head

At Anthony Cole Training Group, we spend a lot of time helping presidents of organizations answer the burning platform question: 

            How do I drive consistent sales growth? 

Often, if not always, one of the answers has to do with hiring better sales people.  That simple statement does not have a simple solution.

One of our business partners is Objective Management Group.  President, David Kurlan, and his staff have developed THE #1 Sales Evaluation Process in the World.  Not only does it provide information on skills, traits and tendencies of the sales people and sales managers, but it also provides great insight into the systems and processes that exist in the company that are either supporting or hindering your sales growth objective!

One of the systems and processes is recruiting!  I don’t remember where I originally heard or read this phrase, but I know I’ve stated it a great number of times in my blog:  “Your companies, systems and processes are perfectly designed for the results you are getting today.” 

           That includes your recruiting process!

If you are not getting enough of the right candidates to talk to, if the candidates you interview fail the interview, if you interview quality candidates, but cannot attract them to your company or… if you are achieving all of the former, but your new hires are failing to succeed quickly or even succeed at all, then something is wrong with your process.

Today, I want to just talk about the first step:  Establishing the profile of the candidates you are looking for.  We use OMG’s program called STAR – Sales Talent Acquisition Routine.  The first step - in the process to hire better sales people - is to establish the right profile and then STICK to that profile.  Do NOT settle for something less than the ideal, perfect candidate.  And... make sure that, when you are evaluating the resumes, pre-hire evaluations and interview notes, you are comparing them to the correct standard.

I’m reading a book by Perry Marshall that has to do with understanding the Pareto Principle as it applies to sales and marketing.  He talks about how organizations of all sorts look at the wrong data to determine success.

Example: Remember when you had to take a particularly difficult test in school?  After you finished it, you talked with others about how you would be “graded on the curve.”  What that simply means is that, if the average score on the test was 50% and you scored 75%, you would probably get an “A”.  The question is:  Did the “A” truly reflect your skill or know-how of the subject matter? Or did it merely reflect how you - or someone else - scored against the average?  The answer, as painful as it might be, is that it compares you to the average. 

The same may hold true for some of your candidates.  Many, though not all, pre-hire evaluations provide you with an evaluation of how your candidate’s score compared to an “average” score.  But is that really what you want?

That, in itself, can be problematic in hiring better sales people. However, it’s not just about the test.  It’s about every step along the way.  In your process, do you:

  • Describe the job… or what it takes to be extraordinary in the role
  • Describe what they are selling… or what kind of competition they have to be successful against?
  • Do you make it clear that your organization puts high pressure on someone to perform? And do you find out if your candidate can survive in that kind of environment?
  • When you interview someone, do you create the same environment that they will encounter regularly and have to be successful in? (i.e – Are you difficult on the phone? Do you make them establish rapport in the initial interview? Do you make them try to close you for the next step?)

To go back to my example about the science test, do you find yourself hiring people that scored 77% to 85% on the test instead of those that scored 100% - plus correctly answered all of the extra-credit questions?

This is the first step.  Here are some resources that might help you figure out how to redesign your recruiting system and process:

Cost of ghosts

Recruiting Process Grader

White paper on Recruiting Sales People

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Qualify Prospects Confidently

Act now to receive your copy of Tony Cole's ground-breaking new audiobook, "Qualifying Prospects with Confidence." You'll get immediate access to 14 audio tracks and a detailed worksheet. Get it now!

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Hiring Solution

This complimentary webinar will show you how the magic of OMG's Sales Candidate Assessment can make your hiring problems a thing of the past! Dave Kurlan presenting. Register here now!

Eliminate 96% Of Hiring Mistakes!

OMG Sales Candidate Assessment Request your FREE Sample
of the #1 Sales Assessment
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Free Recruiting Grader

FREE Recruiting Process Grader

How effective is your company’s process for recruiting top sales talent? Answer this short survey and get immediate results!

Best in Class Sales Training

Introducing the ACTG Learning Center which offers a full curriculum of sales courses at a price you can afford and 24/7 access for your convenience.  Click here for more information.

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A Must-Read for Every Sales Professional!

Qualifying eBook

Get answers and strategies to immediately increase your sales. Download it now- it’s free!

Coach Your Sales People to Success

Tony Cole's focused selling techniques will arm your team with skills to achieve extraodinary sales results. Invite Tony Cole to present at your next workshop, conference, or keynote. Click here for more information.  Get a quick start on your 2013 sales success!

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Writer's Digest Award Winner!

RA book award

 

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Anthony Cole Training Group Wins Award!

2012 Best of Award

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