Sales & Sales Management Expertise

Keeping An Eye Out For Sales Talent

Tags: sales talent, hiring salespeople, managing sales teams

man-peeking

I had to find some way to work my current hospital stay into my blog post. I promised on my signature that I would keep you posted and figured I better get a post in today.

Here’s the quick story of why I’m here:

  • I had a healthy eye
  • I had vision symptoms
  • I was diagnosed with uveal melanoma
  • I had plaque radioactive surgery
  • I hope my vision returns and the tumor is gone

The long version of the story can read something similar to what sales managers face when they hire salspeople and anticipate those sales people to be successful.

Kind of like this progression:

  • I hired my next superstar salesperson
  • Everything was good for awhile, not perfect but good
  • We had a meeting when sales goals were not being met
  • Things got better
  • Things got worse
  • I put them on a performance improvement plan (PIP)
  • Things got better
  • Things got worse
  • We adjusted the compensation model down because of lack of performance
  • Things were okay
  • I put the producer on a PIP plan with a 3-strike rule
  • Yesterday was strike three, my superstar sales person has left the building

Sound/look familiar? What I know, or at least think I know, is this:

  • Your sales team, assuming you have at least 10 salespeople, is represented by the 80/20 rule. 80% of your results/revenue is being generated by about 20% of your team. (Give or take some percentage points – maybe 70/30)
  • If you plot your sales team in a bell curve many, if not most, of the people in the middle standard deviations set up tent there and never leave.
  • You have some people to the far left of the bell curve that have retired and just haven’t told anyone or are failing and you are looking for a miracle.

What I also know is this: Performance improvement plans, compensation changes, re-forecasting, waiting for them to make the turn and threats don’t work. What does work is this:

5 Steps For Building a More Productive Sales Team:

  1. Hire better salespeople
  2. On-board them better
  3. Coach them more/better
  4. Catch them early
  5. Let them go as soon as you know

Additional resources:

#1 Hiring Tool In The World - Stop making hiring mistakes

Bill Eckstrom – Coachign Best Practices

Tony Cole Blog: Performance management that works

Why Companies Struggle with Hiring Quality Salespeople

Tags: managing sales teams, sales success, hire better salespeople

Putting the best people in the right seats is the biggest problem identified by most business owners, especially as it applies to critical sales roles. Here are the 5 most common reasons most companies struggle with hiring quality salespeople.

hire-better-salespeople

#1 Companies outsource their recruiting and the responsibility. Recruiting is something that a company has to own. They can no longer outsource the work and the responsibility. That makes it too easy for people internally to throw up their hands and transfer failures associated within the hiring process to the outsourced firm. If companies are going to improve the quality of their hires, they have to own the process.

#2 There is a lack of a consistent process for constantly searching. Most, if not all, companies make the mistake of looking for candidates only when they have an opening. This leads to many problems:

  • Being held hostage by salespeople with “large books”. Companies feel they cannot do anything about them for fear of losing the “books” since there aren’t any replacements.
  • Feeling desperate to fill a chair with a warm bottom when there is a vacancy. A body,
    any body, is better than no one sitting in the chair (branch).
  • Not replacing underperformers because there isn’t a pipeline of candidates to choose from. The underperformers stay around too long; others know it and realize that they don’t have to perform to keep their job, so overall team production continues to decline.

#3 Companies are not getting quality candidates entering the process. The traditional model of recruiting today is one where the placement firm tries to convince their client why a candidate should be hired. Companies should, on the other hand, work extremely hard to disqualify candidates because there are specific skills that apply for that sales job and many/most candidates do not have those skills. Bottom line, the company has to assess at least two things: 1) Do they have enough of the right strengths to be successful? 2) Will they sell versus can they sell?

#4 There is poor communication about the specific role and expectations of this new hire. Too often, everyone is so excited about putting the deal together (getting the seat filled) that no one takes the time to get into the details of the day-to-day requirements of the job. This leads to early misunderstandings about the role and eventually, failure on the part of the new hire to meet the expectations of the company. Failure to “negotiate on the 1st tee” leads to misunderstanding and failure to execute on the sales goals.

#5 The on-boarding process is inadequate. Most companies are ill-equipped to effectively on-board new sales people. They spend time introducing them to the “culture” of the operation, the mechanics of the job and how to get things done. They introduce them to HR, their support team, marketing and their partners. And, yes, there is discussion about goals, sales activities and how to enter data into CRM. And then… the new hires are on their own.

Companies think that they have hired their next sales superstar and then, 12 months later, they cannot figure out what went wrong. They look at the numbers and discover that the new hires are producing “just like everyone else in the middle of the pack.” The process most companies have in place currently to recruit and hire salespeople perpetuates this problem.

If you need help or more information on hiring better salespeople, we have many resources available for you. You can also text me directly at (513 226-3913) and type Hiring in the subject line. You will get my undivided attention!

 

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Does Your Sales Team Have "Swagger"?

Tags: sales success, building successful sales teams, highly successful sales people

gladiator-swagger
THE (WO)MAN IN THE ARENA
 Excerpt from the speech "Citizenship In A Republic" – Theodore Roosevelt, delivered at the Sorbonne, in Paris, France on 23 April, 1910   
                     
"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat."

What does it take for a salesperson/sales team to live that life?

1. Goals – Not just any goal(s), but goals that, as Walt Disney stated, drive you from the inside: “Dream the big dream, there is nothing in small dreams that stir the blood.”

2. Passion – A passion that emanates from you whenever you are doing what you love to do or talking about what you love to do. When others are in your presence they are compelled to stop and listen and watch/listen while you “burn”.

3. Commitment – The kind of commitment that is best described as “willing to do everything possible to succeed.”

4. Integrity – The determination to do what should be done even if no one is watching and no one will give you credit as a result of doing the right thing simply because it was the right thing to do.

5. Skills – Maybe not all the technical skills required to perfectly execute a behavior, but they have skills like intuition, high “figure it out” ability, stick-to-it-tiveness (not sure that’s a word) persistence, and determination.

6. Willingness to Take Risks – Some people just take shots and decide to aim as they go knowing that they may not at first hit the target but, eventually, they will get sighted-in and hit the objective.

7. Lack of Fear of Failure or Success – Truly, the ability to move on regardless of an outcome is required if you are going to keep going even after you’ve been marred by blood, sweat and blood.

8. Discernment – Those that keep going understand the difference between failing to accomplish an object and being a failure. They understand that a failure is something that occurs in one of their “roles” in life, but who they are on the inside stays intact.

9. Discernment, Part II – They know what shots to take, when to hold them and when to fold them. They estimate the chances of winning and know what they are willing to risk. They stack the deck as best they can and take action knowing full-well they cannot account for every incident that might keep them from success.

10. Ownership – They give credit to others for success and own the outcomes of failure. They don’t blame other people or things; they simply think and or say, “I failed to…”

Imagine just these 10 characteristics, traits or skills all wrapped up in a human being. And that, even with all of these strengths, they continue to grow through risk, success and failure. As a result, they have confidence. They have a sense of invulnerability when it comes to doing the tough stuff. When they walk into a room and start to speak, they own the room. They command attention and they say and do things that others admire and wish they could say and do.

They are people that you want to have on your team and would rather not have to compete against because you know they will do everything they need to do to win. They will be relentless in pursuit of an objective and, while they occasionally lose, most often it is a loss they were willing to suffer in order to do the right things, the right way, for the right reasons.

These people have earned the right to have swagger, to be courageous, assertive and brave because they have fought the fight, they have actually been in the arena, and have had their face marred by dust and sweat and blood; they strove valiantly, made errors, came up short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who actually strove to do the deeds; knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; spends himself in a worthy cause; and at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement

Do you have these people?

Additional Resources:

How to Build a Motivated Sales Team

Hirebettersalespeople.com

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Would You Like to Increase Your Sales by 34%?

 change-streets

This is kind of like asking someone who is out of shape if they would like to get in shape – “in shape” meaning good blood chemistry, appropriate body weight and body fat, a solid level of cardio vascular fitness and muscular strength. The answer to that question is almost always – “Yes, I’d love to get in shape but…”

The “buts” are:

  • I don’t have time
  • I don’t know how
  • It’s hard
  • I cannot change my DNA; I am who I am

You see the problem? The answer is “yes” but, to get “yes”, the person has to sacrifice, change, commit, have great desire and take responsibility. They also have to have specific objectives, a plan to reach those objectives, accountability to the plan and a clear idea of reward and consequences for success and failure.

So, back to my original question, would you like to increase sales by 34%? If so, here’s the activity and math to get you there:

  • Identify the 8 to 10 steps in your sales process
  • Identify the current 12-month sales result
  • Identify the average size sale (Don’t make excuses for “our people sell lots of different products with different price points.” Add up all the sales, divide by the number of sales and you have your average size sale.)
  • Identify the conversion rate of all the steps in the process starting with step #1 in the sales process – calling someone or having contact with a prospect – and ending with the last step – someone said yes and paid you for your product or service. If you don’t know the conversion rate of each step at this point, you just have to do your best estimate.
  • Working with each sales person in your organization, identify 4 steps in the process where they believe they can improve by at least 10%. (Ex: 10% increase in effort – instead of 10 conversations a week, have 11. Increase average size sale – instead of averaging $2,000 per sale, increase to 2,200.)
  • Once you plug these 4 improved steps into a new formula, you will see the sales result increase by a minimum of 34%.

But, that’s just the math – the easy part. Suppose that:

  • 66% of your team are farmers instead of hunters
  • 50% of your team are not very good at closing
  • 1/3 of the team lacks either desire or commitment to be successful in selling and…
  • Up to 25% make excuses for lack of success
  • 66% of the team struggles with recovery from rejection or have beliefs about sales and selling that do not support sales growth

See? This takes us back to:

  • I don’t have time
  • I don’t know how
  • It’s hard
  • I cannot change my DNA; I am who I am

If you find yourself attempting to increase sales by sitting down with your sales team every year and discussing the new goal, this process is probably met with skepticism and reluctance. My bet is that, sometime over the next 12 months when you are doing a performance review with someone who is not at goal, you will hear “That was just the goal you gave me, not what I thought I could do.”

If you are sick and tired of that process and of pushing that rock up the hill, then consider a different approach to getting a much better outcome. There are some things that we do that might be of help to you. Additionally, here are some resources you can find on our website:

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Non-Performing Salespeople and What to Do With Them

Tags: pareto principle, underperforming salespeople, coaching salespeople, hire better salespeople

I have 30 years tenure with my wife, Linda. “Tenure” may not be the right way to put it, so I’ll say it the way I do when we celebrate our wedding anniversary – 30 years of “marital (I pronounce it myrtle) bliss”. And the future is looking really good for me - based on how Linda makes decisions about when to keep things and when to discard them.

tony-linda-beach

You see, Linda hates to get rid of stuff that’s working. Except for coffee makers. She is very particular about how her coffee tastes and how long it takes the coffee maker to make the coffee. Aside from that, as long as an appliance, an article of clothing, a piece of furniture is working, is functional, is not broken – she keeps it. It doesn’t have to function as well as when it was purchased; it just has to function well enough to avoid being replaced by a newer, better model.

I celebrated by 60th birthday last December. For my birthday, I wanted a new wide screen 4k flat screen. I pained her to get rid of our 16 year old, boxy big screen Toshiba. But it still worked. The picture was… well, it was a picture from a 15-year old TV that had the “3 guns” that created the picture on the screen. It was connected to the digital box from the cable company and provided us with all the TV entertainment we needed.

The way I see it, as long as I am functional, I’m in good shape. When things stop working in our house or we finally decide that we need to “get rid of something”, we just put it out by the street in front of our house and, depending on what it is, you can generally count on it being gone before the next morning. So, as long as Linda doesn’t ask me to sit out by the street, I figure I’m good.

What does any of this have to do with you and your sales people? Plenty.

Who do you have on your team that’s just getting by? Yes, they are functional; yes, they produce some numbers that contribute to your overall success; yes, they might manage books of business that may leave if you fire them; and, yes, you need a warm body in the seat. But, does that mean you should keep them? Does that mean you shouldn’t take them to the shop for some upgrading? Does that mean you should tolerate their lack of performance just because the team, as a team, is hitting its numbers? The answer to all three questions is no, no, no.

You know the 80/20 rule right? (Perry Marshall’s 80/20 Power Curve – Must see!) Do you know the 36/96 rule? If you double click on the 80/20, that is what you get. Let’s suppose you have 100 sales people generating 1,000,000 of something. 20 of your salespeople are responsible for generating 800,000 of something. If you apply the 80/20 rule to the remaining 80 people, you get an additional 16 people for a total of 36% of the sales team. These additional 16 people are responsible for 80% of the remaining 200,000 of something – 160,000. Add that to the initial 800,000 for a total of 960,000 somethings or 96% of the total.

36% of the sales team responsible for 96% of your results. What the hell is everyone else doing and why are they still with you?

I understand a couple of things about a couple of things. If you have these 100 people and some of them are sitting in chairs in rural Ohio, Indiana, Wyoming, New Mexico, etc., then you need someone there. You just cannot eliminate the only person working the location, but that doesn’t mean you should not have someone there that isn’t hitting their goal. Now, forget about the rural salespeople for a minute; that doesn’t explain why you keep others that are in the heart of metropolitan areas like Indianapolis or Columbus.

So, here’s what you do:

  1. You get these underperformers in a room (if possible) and you show them the data, show them the results. You then ask them to answer the question - “Why should you stay employed here?” Make them all answer the question. Tell them that their answer isn’t good enough and that, starting today, this is how things are going to work.
  2. How things are going to work – everyone must commit to a sales productivity number by going through the “extra-ordinary discussion”. (Call Jack in our office and he’ll explain that to you or text me at 513-226-3913, Subject Line: “Extra-ordinary” and I’ll give you a call. Please provide your name).
  3. Build a success formula based on that target number.
  4. Build huddles to start collecting relevant sales activity information.
  5. Start providing data back to them.
  6. After 60 days, review your data and, to each individual with whom you are working, report back the business intelligence you’ve gained because of the data.
  7. Put the people that are failing to perform – either sales activity or sales results – on a disciplined coaching schedule so that you can correct the one or two problems contributing to the lack of results –effort and/or execution.
  8. After an additional 60 days, if you do not see improvement, ask them to go sit out by the street.

 

Click below to get more information about:

Our Sales Managed Environment Certification

How to Build a Motivated Sales Team

Hirebettersalespeople.com

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Why Companies Struggle With Hiring Quality Sales People

Tags: hiring sales people, hire better sales people, recruiting sales teams

hiring-great-people_

Putting the best people in the right seats is the biggest problem identified by most business owners, especially as it applies to critical sales roles. Here are the 5 most common reasons most companies struggle with hiring quality salespeople.

#1 Companies outsource their recruiting and the responsibility. Recruiting is something that a company has to own. They can no longer outsource the work and the responsibility. That makes it too easy for people internally to throw up their hands and transfer failures associated within the hiring process to the outsourced firm. If companies are going to improve the quality of their hires, they have to own the process.

#2 There is a lack of a consistent process for constantly searching. Most, if not all, companies make the mistake of looking for candidates only when they have an opening. This leads to many problems:

  • Being held hostage by salespeople with “large books”. Companies feel they cannot do anything about them for fear of losing the “books” since there aren’t any replacements.
  • Feeling desperate to fill a chair with a warm bottom when there is a vacancy. A body,
    any body, is better than no one sitting in the chair (branch).
  • Not replacing underperformers because there isn’t a pipeline of candidates to choose from. The underperformers stay around too long; others know it and realize that they don’t have to perform to keep their job, so overall team production continues to decline.

#3 Companies are not getting quality candidates entering the process. The traditional model of recruiting today is one where the placement firm tries to convince their client why a candidate should be hired. Companies should, on the other hand, work extremely hard to disqualify candidates because there are specific skills that apply for that sales job and many/most candidates do not have those skills. Bottom line, the company has to assess at least two things: 1) Do they have enough of the right strengths to be successful? 2) Will they sell versus can they sell?

#4 There is poor communication about the specific role and expectations of this new hire. Too often, everyone is so excited about putting the deal together (getting the seat filled) that no one takes the time to get into the details of the day-to-day requirements of the job. This leads to early misunderstandings about the role and eventually, failure on the part of the new hire to meet the expectations of the company. Failure to “negotiate on the 1st tee” leads to misunderstanding and failure to execute on the sales goals.

#5 The on-boarding process is inadequate. Most companies are ill-equipped to effectively on-board new sales people. They spend time introducing them to the “culture” of the operation, the mechanics of the job and how to get things done. They introduce them to HR, their support team, marketing and their partners. And, yes, there is discussion about goals, sales activities and how to enter data into CRM. And then… the new hires are on their own.

Companies think that they have hired their next sales superstar and then, 12 months later, they cannot figure out what went wrong. They look at the numbers and discover that the new hires are producing “just like everyone else in the middle of the pack.” The process most companies have in place currently to recruit and hire salespeople perpetuates this problem.

If you need help or more information on hiring better salespeople, we have many resources available for you. You can also text me directly at (513 226-3913) and type “Hiring” in the subject line. You will get my undivided attention!

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Keep Doing What You’ve Been Doing… Unless You Need Different Results

Tags: qualifying prospects, closing more sales, sales prospecting, getting better sales results

A guest post by Walt Gerano, Sales Development Expert, Anthony Cole Training Group

 think-big-1

There is a saying that goes something like “If you do what you have always done, then you will get what you have always gotten.”

I talk to a lot of salespeople who continue to plow ahead working harder to make more sales with the same approach they have used for years. In the words of Dr. Phil, “How’s that workin’ for ya?”

You would probably agree that the basics around what salespeople need to do to be successful hasn’t changed – they still must hunt, qualify and close.  If your results are not what you want them to be, then maybe what needs to change is the way you go about those three critical tasks.

How is your Hunting?

  • Are you still hunting with old technology or are you using Sales 2.0 tools like LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook to connect with prospects, customers and former customers?
  • Are you still relying on mass marketing approaches in the hopes that enough people will respond only to realize that most of those that do are looking for free information?
  • Do you have a systematic approach to generating a stream of introductions and referrals or do you still depend on cold calls?

What about Qualifying?

  • Are you still telling the prospect why they should do business with you or asking them why they agreed to meet with you?
  • Do you have an effective selling system that tells you when to stay and when to walk away?
  • Are you selling consultatively? Asking good questions, asking enough questions, developing relationships early in the sales process, understanding why prospects buy and listening effectively?

And what about Closing?

  • Does your prospect agree to give you a decision after you present your solution or do you get a lot of “think it over” and “we’ll let you know?”
  • Do you get derailed because you present without all of the decision makers present?
  • Do you finish presenting your solution and NOT ask for the business by asking, “What do you think” or “What questions do you have” OR will you close with “What would you like to do now?”

 

Today’s buyers have access to information that used to be unavailable to them and there are always going to be desperate salespeople that will give them whatever they want with the hope of getting a “shot” to write the account.

Maybe your results are where you want them to be, but if not, think about what YOU are going to get if you don’t do some things differently.

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Are Curve Balls Putting You in a Sales Slump?

Tags: sales prospecting, closing sales, sales curve balls

A guest post by Mark Trinkle, Sales Development Expert, Anthony Cole Training Group

baseball-batterl

“Straight balls – bats like very much…curve balls – bats afraid.”

If you are a fan of the movie Major League, I’m sure you recognize that opening line from the outfielder, Pedro Cerrano, who had a lot of trouble hitting curve balls.  So, in honor of baseball’s All-Star Game that was played in my hometown of Cincinnati, today’s post is all about curve balls.

Do you know who else has trouble hitting curve balls?  Salespeople. And I’m not talking about resurrecting memories from their baseball playing days, but rather I am talking about the curve balls that get tossed at them by their prospects during a sales call.

At Anthony Cole Training, we define curve ball questions as questions that could make you nervous…or questions that might make you squirm. Quite simply, they are questions you wish the prospect simply would not ask.  Now, clearly, the remedy for curve ball questions is adequate pre-call planning, but let’s leave that for another day and another Sales Brew.

For now, let’s look at some of the typical curve ball questions. Here are just a few:

  1. Why should I do business with you? Now that question is one prospects are taught when they attend prospect school; it gets covered on day 1.  If you want to diffuse it, your best bet is to simply respond with “I’m not sure that you should.”

  2. How big is your company? That is another question that has been known to make salespeople look foolish.  And, no doubt, part of the problem here is that the salesperson generally does not know why the prospect is asking the question.  So, here is your response… “I’m curious, I get that question a lot…why do you ask?”

  3. What makes you unique…or how are you different from your competition? Answer this question and you immediately begin to look like a salesperson.  Your best bet is to be able to succinctly sum up what your existing clients would say are the reasons why they hired you.

  4. We’re impressed with what you have presented, but we need some time to look over your proposal. Clearly, this happens most of the time because the salesperson delivers a solution without setting up the expectation around the yes/no option (i.e. we don’t deliver solutions without knowing we are going to get an answer.)  But, nonetheless, your best response here is to ask either “What happens to your problem while you do that?”…or “What have we missed or what is unclear that is preventing you from making a decision today one way or the other?”

Here is the thing about curve ball questions.  They are usually pitches in the dirt.  Stop swinging at them.

Thanks for listening…now go sell like a champion today.

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Questions to Ask to Gain Clarity

Tags: asking questions, closing sales, solving problems for prospects

A guest post by Jack Kasel, Sales Development Expert, Anthony Cole Training Group

woman-thinkingt

In his book, 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, Steven Covey has a quote… “Seek first to understand. Then to be understood.”  I think that statement is especially true for sales professionals.

When we coach our clients, we try to get them to understand and remember these three tips when in conversation with their prospects and clients:

  1. The statement they make isn’t the actual statement.
  2. The question they ask isn’t the true question.
  3. The problem they have isn’t the actual problem.

So, as your prospects talk about their main concerns, your job is to determine the following: Is this a symptom or a problem?  Problems get solved, symptoms are tolerated.  I was working with a prospect and he kept saying he needed to fix his cash flow problem.  The more we talked, the more it became clear that cash flow wasn’t the real problem. The real problem was he missed out on an opportunity to purchase one of his competitors.  The symptom was cash flow, the problem was missing opportunities to acquire market share.  We focused on fixing his true problem.

One of the ways, and really the only way, to bring clarity to the conversation is by asking or saying the following when we hear prospects make statements or ask questions:

  • Tell me more about that . . .
  • What happens if that problem isn’t fixed?
  • When you say (insert statement here), I’m not sure I know what you mean.
  • Many people ask me that question for a variety of reasons; I would like to hear yours.

We also need to listen to emotionally charged words such as . . .

  • Need to fix…
  • I’m going to…
  • We simply can’t tolerate…
  • Others include: worried, upset, mad, frustrated

These are emotionally driven words and emotion drives sales.  Facts and figures justify sales, but emotion drives it.  If we don’t fully understand the reason for the statement, the purpose of the question, or dig deeper to find the real problem, we will waste time and miss opportunities.  I hope this audio clip has brought some clarity to your sales process.   

Now...someone needs what you do, go find them!

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2 Really Easy Things to Do to Increase Sales

Tags: improve sales, sales management, increase sales

Successful-Salesperson

Ever watch a movie for the 2nd and/or 3rd time and notice something you didn’t notice the first time? I know the answer is yes.

I just watched the Legend of Bagger Vance for the 3rd time. Jack Lemon is the narrator of the story and the other star characters are played by Matt Damon, Charlize Theron and Will Smith.

During the match, Bagger Vance has a young assistant, Hardy Greaves (J. Michael Moncrief), who caddies after Bagger leaves. The beginning of the film features Hardy as an old man (Jack Lemmon) playing golf in the present day. Hardy experiences a heart attack and loses consciousness. The story ends with an old Hardy awakening and seeing a never-aging Bagger Vance on the golf course. As Bagger beckons, Hardy follows and the film ends.

I don’t recall seeing that when I’ve watched the movie before.

I just started reading (again) Verne Harnish’s book: The Rockefeller Habits. In my notes, I wrote “choke points”. Verne refers to choke points when he discusses how a company has to figure out what is the one thing or things that keep the company from growing. Certainly, when I read it the first time I did read it the first time, but I had forgotten how it is applied to business. Often, we talk to our clients about identifying the choke points in the sales process so that sales managers can coach their sales people specifically to how the problem impacts their sales outcomes.

My point here is to apply the same thing to your situation – your business, your sales team or your own personal sales practice. So, here are my 2 Really Easy Things To Do To Increase Sales:

1)     Identify what you are masterful at… and then identify why you are masterful at it!
2)     Identify what you suck at… identify why you suck at it… and then fix the why!

I know it’s a little more complicated than that; well, not really complicated - to increase sales growth - but think about what would happen if you just did those two easy things RIGHT now and then implemented the steps to model and repeat the stuff you are masterful at and fix the stuff you suck at.

Here’s the final scene: Collect data on everything you do. Use the data to gather business intelligence on the stuff you do everyday that you are masterful at and the stuff you suck at. Look at the data on a very regular basis – at least weekly. Adjust accordingly.

Additional resource: Let us help you find out what your team is masterful at and what they suck at: Sales Effectiveness and Impact Analysis Sample Findings